Advayavada Buddhism

ON COURSE WITH NATURE.

Archive for the month “February, 2016”

Advayavada Study Plan – week 9

[week 9] The purpose of the autonomous Advayavada Study Plan is that we study (and debate in a local group, the family circle or with good friends) the meaning and implications of the weekly subject, not as a formal and impersonal intellectual exercise, but in the context of whatever we ourselves are presently doing or are concerned with, or about, such as our health, relationships, work, study, our place in society, etc. To continue with this quarter’s 13-week action plan, in week 9 we shall further develop our very best attitude to carry out our improved personal objective. This task is based on the fourth step on the Noble Eightfold Path: samma-kammanta (in Pali) or samyak-karmanta (in Sanskrit); in Advayavada Buddhism’s personalized usage: our very best disposition or attitude; in Dutch: onze beste instelling (de vierde stap op het edele achtvoudige pad). To follow this ASP conscientiously is of course already proof of a serious and positive attitude. (from advayavada.org/#plan)

Advayavada Study Plan – week 8

[week 8] In weeks 1 to 5 we treated the preliminary subjects, in week 6 we again honestly reviewed and took stock of our personal situation (first step on the Noble Eightfold Path), in week 7 we took an appropriate and timely decision to adjust our course (second step), and to continue with this quarter’s 13-week Advayavada Study Plan (ASP), this week we shall again put our decision and improved objective in writing as precisely as possible; Advayavada Buddhism does not tell you what to do or believe, but invites us all to make the very best of our own lives by attuning as best as possible with wondrous overall existence advancing over time now in its manifest direction. This task is based on the third step on the Noble Eightfold Path: samma-vacha (in Pali) or samyag-vac (in Sanskrit); in Advayavada Buddhism’s fully personalized usage: our very best enunciation or definition of our intention (as Karl Popper says, putting our ideas into words, or better, writing them down, makes an important difference, for in this way they become objective and criticizable); in Dutch: onze beste uitleg (de derde stap op het edele achtvoudige pad). (from advayavada.org/#plan)

Advayavada Study Plan – week 7

[week 7] To continue with this quarter’s 13-week Advayavada Study Plan (ASP), this week we shall again take an appropriate and timely decision to adjust our course. This task is based on the 2nd step on the Noble Eightfold Path: samma-sankappa (Pali) or samyak-samkalpa (Sanskrit), in Advayavada Buddhism: our very best resolution or determination; in Dutch: onze beste beslissing (de tweede stap op het edele achtvoudige pad). In Advayavada Buddhism, the Noble Eightfold Path is fully personalized: it is firmly based on what we increasingly know about ourselves and our world, and trusting our own intentions, feelings and conscience. Adherence to the familiar five precepts (not to kill, not to steal, sexual restraint, not to lie, and refraining from alcohol and drugs) and a well-considered understanding of the three (in Advayavada Buddhism, four) signs of being and the Buddha’s four noble truths suffice to start off and proceed on the Path at any time. (from advayavada.org/#plan)

Advayavada Study Plan – week 6

[week 6] When the Noble Eightfold Path is followed conscientiously, it becomes nothing less than the main karmic factor in one’s life, i.e. in one’s passing share in the universal interdependent origination process (madhyamaka-pratityasamutpada). The 13-week Advayavada Study Plan (ASP) is repeated four times a year for this lofty purpose. In weeks 1 to 5 we again treated the preliminary subjects and, to continue with the current first quarter of 2016, in week 6 we shall again honestly review and take stock of our personal situation. This task is based on the 1st step on the Noble Eightfold Path: samma-ditthi (Pali) or samyag-dristi (Sanskrit), in Advayavada Buddhism: our very best comprehension or insight; in Dutch: ons beste inzicht (de eerste stap op het edele achtvoudige pad). (from advayavada.org/#plan)

Xu Yun

“Set the time of sitting! Make it just as long as it takes one fragrant incense stick to burn down.

In that time we can thread the basic principles of Buddhism into a lovely string of pearls.”

~ Xu Yun

Ch’an Master Xu Yun lived to be 120. He lived from the mid 1800s until the mid 1900s and never traveled to the West—but many westerners traveled to the East to learn from him and his influence is felt here.

As a child, he saw monks performing a funeral service for his grandmother. Seeing these monks gave him inspiration; he started tracking down and reading sutras and he fell in love with the Dharma.

At the age of 19, he ran away from home to become a monk. This means he spent 100 years studying and practicing the Dharma full time—that’s longer than any teacher I can think of.

His…

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Desiderata, by Gavin Aung Than

Zen Flash

When “Zen Pencils” cartoonist Gavin Than asked fans to vote for their favorite poem to be turned into a comic strip, they chose “Desiderata”, the widely popular poem written by Max Ehrmann in 1927, whose title in Latin translates to “things to be desired”. The poem has been described as a survival guide for life. Than’s illustrations bring these celebrated words alive in a unique way.

Source: Desiderata, by Gavin Aung Than | DailyGood

http://www.dailygood.org

Desiderata

–by Gavin Aung Than, syndicated from zenpencils.com, Jan 19, 2016

(Quote by Max Ehrmann)

Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars. –Max Ehrmann, Desiderata


This above cartoon strip originally appeared on Zen Pencils and is reprinted here with permission from artist Gavin Aung Than. Gavin is a freelance cartoonist based in Melbourne, Australia. After working…

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What makes us suffer

Zen Flash


“It is not impermanence that makes us suffer.
What makes us suffer is wanting things to be
permanent when they are not.”
~ Thich Nhat Hanh
Artist: Graham Gercken

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Advayavada Study Plan – week 5

[week 5] In Secular Buddhism generally, firmly bearing in mind the impermanence and the selflessness and, therefore, transitoriness, of all things without exception, the focus is on the correct interpretation and realization of the historical Buddha’s so-called ‘four noble truths’: 1) that of the ubiquity of existential suffering in the world, 2) that ignorant craving and attachment are the actual and immediate causes of such suffering, 3) that this suffering shall cease altogether when we deal with and overcome its causes, and 4) that the sure way to achieve this is by following the Noble Eightfold Path, which, in Advayavada Buddhism, is understood as an ongoing and fully autonomous, non-prescriptive, investigative and creative process of progressive insight, reflecting in human terms wondrous overall existence becoming over time in its manifest direction. (from advayavada.org/#plan)

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