Advayavada Buddhism

ON COURSE WITH NATURE.

Archive for the month “March, 2016”

Advayavada Study Plan – weeks 12 and 13

[weeks 12 & 13] In week 11 we concentrated on mustering our very best effort and commitment to fulfil our improved objective (sixth step on the Noble Eightfold Path), and, to conclude this quarter’s 13-week Advayavada Study Plan, in week 12 we shall again make our best possible evaluation of our efforts to date and in week 13 we shall continue to develop and deepen our very best meditation towards samadhi*. These tasks are based on the seventh and eighth step on the Noble Eightfold Path: respectively samma-sati and samma-samadhi (in Pali) or samyak-smriti and samyak-samadhi (in Sanskrit); in Advayavada Buddhism’s personalized usage: our very best observation or reflection and self-correction, and our very best meditation or concentration towards samadhi; in Dutch: onze beste aandacht en onze beste bezinning (de zevende en achtste stap op het edele achtvoudige pad).
*Samadhi (Pali and Sanskrit): total or perfect concentration (of the mind, enstasy); total absorption in the object of meditation; the merging of subject and object; realization of the sameness of the part and the whole, of the identity of body and mind, of form and emptiness, of samsara and nirvana, of the immediate and the ultimate; perfect attunement with wondrous overall existence advancing in its manifest direction; oceanic feeling; wonder, awe, rapture; essential purity; deep love and compassion; awareness of our common ground and the innocence of sex. (from advayavada.org/#plan)

Epigenetics: Can stress really change your genes?

Zen Flash

I am posting this today because it points to what Buddhism has been saying since Buddha: The universal law of karma is real, and it affects us and our descendants for generations. Be careful what you think, as you are affecting your grandchildren’s health!

We all know that stress can wreak havoc on your health but what does it do to your genes?

Source: Epigenetics: Can stress really change your genes?

theconversation.com

Karin Garrie

Lecturer/Senior Lecturer, Nottingham Trent University

March 15, 2016

The Dutch famine of 1944 was a terrible time for many in the Netherlands – with around 4.5m people affected and reliant on soup kitchens after food supplies were stopped from getting into the area by German blockades. As many as 22,000 people were thought to have died, and those who survived would find it extremely difficult to ever fully recover.

The dietary intake of people in affected…

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Small acts, when multiplied by millions of people, can transform the world

Zen Flash

 “We are Life, in human form. Descendants of the stars and galaxies, children of the oceans and forests, creative expressions of Nature. As much a part of this planet as the rivers, trees, mountains and butterflies.

As more and more of us wake up to that deeper sense of identity we will be more easily able to transcend old thought patterns and beliefs. Observing Nature’s Systems closely, studying her ways, we can re-write and delete old programming.

To truly bring an end to the destructiveness of humanity- to really transform the world- a deeper wisdom has to first arise from within. We must “be the change” as Gandhi put it. We have to free ourselves first, transform our ways of thinking, feeling and behaving.

Then take the wisdom of our wholeness and apply it to everything we say and do, to all fields of human activity. Economics, entertainment, education…

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Advayavada Study Plan – week 11

[week 11] In week 10 we implemented our improved way of doing things (fifth step on the Noble Eightfold Path), and, to continue with this quarter’s 13-week Advayavada Study Plan, in week 11 we shall concentrate on mustering our very best effort and commitment to fulfil our improved objective. This task is based on the sixth step on the Noble Eightfold Path: samma-vayama (in Pali) or samyag-vyayama (in Sanskrit); in Advayavada Buddhism’s personalized usage: our very best effort and commitment; in Dutch: onze beste inspanning (de zesde stap op het edele achtvoudige pad). Importantly, as we advance properly along the Buddha’s Middle Way responding to his promise of Nirvana, we shall be ridding ourselves of the so-called ten fetters (dasa-samyojana) that restrict us to samsaric life: 1) belief in the self, 2) scepticism regarding the Path, 3) attachment to rituals, 4) partiality for certain things, 5) prejudice against certain things, 6) clinging to physical life, 7) hope of a hereafter, 8) conceit and pride, 9) intolerance and irritability, and 10) the last remnants of our ignorance. (from advayavada.org/#plan)

Social Influences on Neuroplasticity (Davidson and McEwen)

Experiential factors shape the neural circuits underlying social and emotional behavior from the prenatal period to the end of life. These factors include both incidental influences such as early adversity as well as intentional influences that can be produced in humans through specific interventions designed to promote prosocial behavior and well-being. Key extant evidence in animal models and humans is reviewed. While the precise mechanisms of plasticity are still not fully understood, moderate to severe stress appears to increase growth of several sectors of the amygdala while effects in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex tend to be opposite. Structural and functional changes in the brain have been observed with cognitive therapy and certain forms of meditation and lead to the suggestion that well-being and other prosocial characteristics might be enhanced through training. (Richard J. Davidson and Bruce S. McEwen, in Social influences on neuroplasticity: Stress and interventions to promote well-being, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3491815/)

We can adjust our sails

Zen Flash

We can not change the direction of the wind but we can adjust our sails.

Chinese saying

Source:Earnest Tao

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Connecting & Letting Go – Christopher Chase

Creative by Nature

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If I had to summarize what I’ve learned from Taoist and Buddhist philosophy it’s been a deeper understanding of how to both let go and connect with life. It’s a kind of yin and yang approach to everything.

In the Tao te Ching the advice is to yield with difficulties, reduce clutter, create space, let go. So over the years I’ve tried to apply this to my thoughts, emotions, goals, expectations and opinions, especially when these are creating fear, anxiety or unhappiness.

This approach has helped me to let go of stress, flow with problems, accept situations that were difficult, and to find deeper peace.

On the flip side the great masters of the East offer wonderful advice on how to connect more closely with the world around us, with nature, with creative activities and people, with the great flow of all existence. They emphasize how we are each a…

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Primal virtue

Zen Flash

Carrying body and soul and embracing the one, can you avoid separation? Attending fully and becoming supple, can you be as a newborn babe?

Washing and cleansing the primal vision, can you be without stain? Loving all men and ruling the country, can you be without cleverness?

Opening and closing the gates of heaven, can you play the role of woman? Understanding and being open to all things, are you able to do nothing?

Giving birth and nourishing, bearing yet not possessing, working yet not taking credit, leading yet not dominating. This is the Primal Virtue.

~Lao Tsu
Tao te Ching, Verse 10

Source: Tao & Zen – Carrying body and soul and embracing the one, can you…

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The Global Butterfly Effect

Tales from the Conspiratum

Source: The Global Butterfly Effect | Creative by Nature

With permission

creativesystemsthinking.wordpress.com

Image

 “We are Life, in human form. Descendants of the stars and galaxies, children of the oceans and forests, creative expressions of Nature. As much a part of this planet as the rivers, trees, mountains and butterflies.”

For thousands of years people in Western cultures have been wrestling with the illusions we’ve spun from our dualistic mindsets and beliefs. It’s like we’ve been dreaming a shared nightmare together, grounded in the mechanistic ways our society has been organized, rooted in how we live and think.

Across the centuries, the very foundation of our so-called “Civilization” has been based on ideas of separation and superiority- men above, women below, Kings above, peasants below, humans above, Nature below, etc. Walls of separation in our hearts and minds, a sense of sin and abandonment, believing that our entire…

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Advayavada Study Plan – week 10

[week 10] In week 6 we honestly reviewed and took stock of our personal situation (first step on the Noble Eightfold Path), in week 7 we took an appropriate and timely decision to adjust our course (second step), in week 8 we again put our decision and objective in writing (third step), in week 9 we further developed our very best attitude to carry out our improved objective (fourth step), and, to continue with this quarter’s 13-week Advayavada Study Plan, in week 10 we shall implement our improved way of doing things as best as possible. This task is based on the fifth step on the Noble Eightfold Path: samma-ajiva (in Pali) or samyag-ajiva (in Sanskrit); in Advayavada Buddhism’s personalized usage: our very best implementation, realization or putting into practice, bearing in mind that truly commendable deeds are only those which are in agreement with wondrous overall existence and take us forward at the fundamental level of our life; in Dutch: onze beste uitvoering (de vijfde stap op het edele achtvoudige pad). (from advayavada.org/#plan)

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