Advayavada Buddhism

ON COURSE WITH NATURE.

Archive for the month “July, 2016”

How nature works and the way people think

Zen Flash

“The major problems in the world are the result of the difference between how nature works and the way people think”

― Gregory Bateson

Tao & Zen

View original post

Keep me away from the wisdom that does not cry

Advayavada Study Plan – week 30

[Advayavada Study Plan – week 30] Human beings are essentially prone to existential suffering (see week 29) because they wrongly strive after and try to hold on to things, concepts and situations which they believe to be permanent, but are not. Their mistaken view of things is produced by a thirst, craving or clinging (tanha in Pali, trishna in Sanskrit) which is in turn caused by their fundamental ignorance (avijja in Pali, avidya in Sanskrit) or disbelief of the true nature of existence, particularly the changeability of everything (see week 27) and the selflessness and emptiness of all things (see week 28). This thirst, craving or clinging, which is the second noble truth of Buddhism, can moreover easily take on a more unwholesome form: already as sensuous desire, ill-will, laziness, impatience or distrust will it seriously hinder the individual’s efforts to better his or her circumstances, as well as contaminate the efforts of others to improve theirs. (from advayavada.org/#plan)

Be a light unto yourself

Zen Flash

When Buddha was on his death bed he noticed his young disciple Anan was weeping. ‘Why are you weeping, Anan?’ he asked.

‘Because the light of the world is about to be extinguished and we will be in darkness.’

The Buddha summoned up all his remaining energy and spoke what were to be his final words on earth: ‘Anan, Anan, be a light unto yourself.’

~The Pali Canon~

Tao & Zen

View original post

Tao Te Ching, Chapter 49

Zen Flash

The sage has no mind of his own.
He is aware of the needs of others.
He is good to people who are good.
He is also good to people who are not good.
Because Virtue is goodness.

Has faith in people who are faithful.
And also in people who are not faithful.
Because Virtue is faithfulness.

The sage is shy and humble –
to the world he seems confusing.
Others look to him and listen.
He behaves like a little child.

~ Lao Tzu ~
Tao Te Ching, Chapter 49

Source: Tao & Zen

View original post

All things, material and spiritual, originate from one Source

Zen Flash

“All things, material and spiritual, originate from one Source and are related as if they were one family. The past, present, and future are all contained in the life force (気, ki). The Universe emerged and developed from one Source, and we evolved through the optimal process of unification and harmonization.”

~Morihei Ueshiba
Japanese founder of Aikido

Source: Tao & Zen

View original post

Advayavada Study Plan – week 29

[Advayavada Study Plan – week 29] Dukkha (Pali) or duhkha (Sanskrit) means suffering, sorrow, dissatisfaction, frustration, anxiety, or stress; the ubiquity of suffering is the third of the three, in Advayavada Buddhism, four signs or marks or basic facts of being, the other three being the impermanence or changeability of everything (see week 27), the selflessness and emptiness of all things (see week 28), and evolution or, in human terms, progress. Suffering is also the first of the four noble truths of Buddhism, which, in Advayavada Buddhism, does not include emotional grief nor physical pain, and is, above all, not seen as a permanent feature of reality; it is chiefly understood as the existential distress and distrust of life non-liberated human beings are prone to, and which is essentially caused by the unhealthy and socially infectious feeling that reality does not conform to their desires and mistaken expectations. The unremitting persistency of human distress, alienation and conflict is undeniably due to the very many everywhere not knowing or not understanding or simply disbelieving the true nature of existence. (from advayavada.org/#plan)

The Global Butterfly Effect

Creative by Nature

“What the caterpillar calls the end of the world, the master calls a butterfly.” ―Richard Bach, Illusions
 
butterfly-on-human-hand-89644
 
We are living now during one of the most important time periods in human history. Our global species is at a turning point, the actions and decisions we take collectively over the next few decades will determine the path humanity (and all life on our planet) takes far into the future― towards either greater harmony or chaos, stability or destruction.
 
If one turns on the television, the news does not sound good. The mass media feeds our fears, warning of global warming, terrorism, racism, wealth inequality, economic instability and ecological collapse.
 
While most of these problems are real, what the media (and our leaders) do not understand is how these issues are ALL symptoms of the destructive ways so-called “advanced” civilizations see the world and behave. That the way to solve these problems requires that…

View original post 1,201 more words

Melt the ego (Osho)

Advayavada Study Plan- week 28

[Advayavada Study Plan – week 28] Anatta (Pali) or anatman (Sanskrit) means no-self. The Buddhist anatta or anatmata doctrine teaches that no imperishable soul, spirit or self exists in the person in the sense of a permanent, eternal, integral, and independent substance. In Mahayana Buddhism, the nissvabhava doctrine teaches further that in fact all things without exception are empty (shunya) of self-nature (svabhava); svabhava-shunyata (lit. self-nature emptiness) is a central notion in Madhyamaka philosophy. In Advayavada Buddhism, the selflessness of all existents is one of the four signs or marks or basic facts of being, the other three being the impermanence or changeability of everything (see week 27), the ubiquity of existential suffering, and evolution or, in human terms, progress. (from advayavada.org/#plan)

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: