Advayavada Buddhism

ON COURSE WITH NATURE.

Archive for the tag “Daniel Scharpenburg”

Awakening With Breathing | Patheos

“This technique has been around for a long time. It is almost certainly the oldest and most widespread form of meditation practice. It has been used to bring people to see their true natures. And it still works. Our true nature is very simple, but it’s easy for us to miss. It’s always with us, but we get so distracted all the time.”

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Verses on Faith in Mind (Seng-ts’an)

Creative by Nature

“The Great Way is not difficult for those not attached to preferences. When neither like nor dislike arises, all is clear and undisguised. If you wish to know the truth, then hold to no opinions for or against anything. To set up what you like against what you dislike is the disease of the mind..”

10408066_849888291705531_6250928082129244220_nThe following is Richard Clarke’s translation of the Hsin Hsin Ming (Verses on Faith in Mind) by Seng-ts’an, the 3rd patriarch of Zen….

The Great Way is not difficult for those not attached to preferences. When neither like nor dislike arises, all is clear and undisguised. Separate by the smallest amount, however, and you are as far from it as heaven is from earth.

If you wish to know the truth, then hold to no opinions for or against anything. To set up what you like against what you dislike is the dis-ease of the mind.

When…

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Saving Ourselves

The path of Buddhism is called the Dharma. It is a method for saving ourselves.

I don’t mean that as a trite platitude. The Dharma will save you. Not save your soul from damnation. As Buddhists we don’t believe in that. The Dharma will save you from yourself. It will save you from your own greed and delusion. It will save you from that feeling that you are hopeless or broken or weak.

The Dharma is direct and precise. It can lead us to a state of realization that is beyond the state of delusion in which we spend most of our time. Practicing the Dharma is nothing less than the highest human aspiration. We are trying to attain Enlightenment and transcend our egoic self.
We use mind training to work on our poisons, these are the things that hold up back from our potential. Greed, hatred, and delusion are…

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Shosan’s Five Points in Buddhist Practice

Suzuki Shosan, the samurai who became a zen monk in the 1600s in Japan, said that there were five points in Buddhist practice.

He listed five reasons why we should engage in the Dharma. I think these five points are relevant for us today.

Shosan’s Five Points for Buddhist Practice:

1) Usefulness in society

2) Upholding the precepts

3) Separating the self from personal views and experiencing oneness.

4) Freeing the mind from attachment to objects

5) Destruction of evil passions.

I’ll examine these one at a time.

Usefulness in society

Conquering your delusions and transforming yourself helps everyone. If we demonstrate that delusions can be overcome then we are setting an example for others. Not only that, but as we strengthen our compassion, we are helping others and trying to build a more compassionate society.

Upholding the Precepts

The precepts help us control any tendency to twist and distort…

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Paradox in the Diamond Sutra

No one claims the Diamond Sutra is an easy text to understand.

It’s said to be so full of meaning that it can point us directly to Enlightenment, so of course it’s not an easy text. It would be crazy for someone to pick this text as their first class to teach at their local Buddhist temple. *ahem*

Anyway, it’s tough. That’s what I’m trying to say. A lot of the passages are have to be read multiple times to be understood and it’s so repetitive that that can be overwhelming too.

But I want to talk about what I think is the hardest part to grasp for most people. That’s the use of paradoxical statements. I’m going to present one example, but bear in mind that the Buddha uses this kind of statement several times in the sutra.

“What do you think, Subhuti? Does a bodhisattva create a serene…

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